Tiramisu

Tiramisù - Author: Le ciel azuré


Tiramisu


Tiramisu ([tiɾamiˈsu], Italian spelling: Tiramisù; lit. "pick me up" or "lift me up") is an Italian dessert. It is made of ladyfingers (Italian: Savoiardi) dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of egg yolks and mascarpone cheese, and flavored with cocoa. The recipe has been adapted into many varieties of puddings, cakes and other desserts.


 

History

There is some debate regarding the origin of Tiramisu. Accounts by Carminantonio Iannaccone and Nathan Lopez (as researched and written about by The Washington Post) establish the creation of Tiramisu by him on 24 December 1969 in Via Sottotreviso while he was head chef at Treviso, near Venice.

Alternatively, it may have originated as a variation of another layered dessert, Zuppa Inglese. It is mentioned in Giovanni Capnist's 1983 cookbook I Dolci Del Veneto, while Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary gives 1982 as the first mention of the dessert. Other sources report the creation of the cake to have originated in the city of Siena. Some confectioners were said to have created it in honour of Cosimo III on the occasion of his visit to the country.

The translation of the name Italian tiramisù (tirami sù) means "pick-me-up" (metaphorically, "make me happy"). This may refer to the caffeine in the espresso and effect of cocoa used in the recipe.

Preparation

Tiramisu is a layered dessert, consisting of alternating layers of coffee-soaked Savoiardi biscuits and sweet mixture of mascarpone cheese, eggs and sugar.

To prepare the biscuit layer, the Savoiardi are soaked in espresso or strong coffee.

For the mascarpone cheese layer, a mixture of egg yolks and sugar is first prepared, to which the mascarpone cheese is then added. This mixture is spread over the coffee-soaked biscuits. More layers are added and the dessert is finally topped with a dusting of cocoa powder.

Countless variations for Tiramisu exist. Some cooks use other cakes or sweet, yeasted breads, such as panettone, in place of ladyfingers. Other cheese mixtures are used as well, some containing raw eggs, and others containing no eggs at all. Marsala wine can be added to the recipe, but other liquors are frequently substituted for it in both the coffee and the cheese mixture, including dark rum, Madeira, port, brandy or Irish Cream such as Bailey's.


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiramisu ...

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